Importance of Military Rules and Regulations

Why it is important to Obey Military Rules and Regulation Military discipline and effectiveness is built on the foundation of obedience to orders. Recruits are taught to obey, immediately and without question, orders from their superiors, right from day-one of boot camp. Which is why we work so well by following orders from the more experienced leaders who have been doing this for years. We have plenty of obedience in Charlie company and I feel it is one of the best units I have been in.

It has made me want to persue a carreer in the military and I no rules and regulations is what is going to make me move up the ranks and make me a all around better soldier. I no I need to work on discapile sometimes and am doing corrective training right now to make me become a better sodier. So in my essay I have listed many chararistics which in the history and present day made what the army is today. I feel the army values have a big role in rules and regulations because if you follow the values you will not stray off in being disobedient.

It’s very important to follow directions, or else the world would be in chaos. When some tells you that you must follow directions so that everything can go in an orderly fashion, it’s important do because they know what’s going to happen if you don’t. It’s important to follow directions because if you don’t something can go wrong, it’s important follow directions because if you don’t you’ll get in trouble, and it’s also important to follow directions because if you don’t you’ll be writing this essay too.

It’s important to follow directions because if you don’t something can go wrong. If you decide to cross the street and someone tells you not to, their telling you for a reason, maybe so that you won’t get hit by a car or get shot at in a drive by shooting. It’s important follow directions because if you don’t you’ll get in trouble. If you decide to cross the street after they told you not to, you’ll suffer the consequences. In this case the consequences is getting hit by a car our getting shot in a drive by shooting.

If you don’t suffer the consequences that way you’ll suffer another way. Finally, it’s important to follow directions because if you don’t you’ll be writing this essay too. If you didn’t suffer the consequences by getting shot at or getting ran over, you’ll suffer by writing this essay. By writing this essay you’ll be missing many important television shows. Even if you weren’t talking in class while taking the test, because you we’re the last one taking the test, you’ll have to write this essay too.

In the end, it’s important to follow directions, because if you don’t something can go wrong. They’re telling you to listen to them for a reason, because they probably know more than you do. It’s important follow directions because if you don’t you’ll get in trouble. You might get hit by a car while crossing the street or get shot at in a drive by shooting. It’s also important to follow directions because if you don’t you’ll be writing this essay too. By writing an essay like this on, it will take up you’re time and you’ll miss a lot of your favorite television shows.

SO FOLLOW DIRECTIONS. When one enlists in the United States Military, active duty or reserve, they take the following oath: I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Officers, upon commission, swear to the following:

I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. Military members who fail to obey the lawful orders of their superiors risk serious consequences. Article 90 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) makes it a crime for a military member to WILLFULLY disobey a superior commissioned officer.

Article 91 makes it a crime to WILLFULLY disobey a superior Noncommissioned or Warrant Officer. Article 92 makes it a crime to disobey any lawful order (the disobedience does not have to be “willful” under this article). In fact, under Article 90, during times of war, a military member who willfully disobeys a superior commissioned officer can be sentenced to death. The importance of rules and regulations in the military are there so a soldier knows how to act and behave while in the military. We have rules and regulations to instill upon a soldier how to properly conduct him/herself while in the military uniform.

We are put on a higher pedestal than civilians at all times. We are to behave in a different manner than anybody. We are to at all times conduct ourselves in ways that most people would not understand. The rules and regulations are put out so that we know what we can and cannot do at all times. We are to behave at all times in a professional manner and dress properly. The Army is a uniformed service where discipline is judged, in part, by the manner in which a soldier wears a prescribed uniform, as well as by the individual’s personal appearance.

Therefore, a neat and well-groomed appearance by all soldiers is fundamental to the Army and contributes to building the pride and esprit essential to an effective military force. A vital ingredient of the Army’s strength and military effectiveness is the pride and self-discipline that American soldiers bring to their Service through a conservative military image. So we are to uphold an image that makes us stand out and look professional at all times. On duty and off duty. Our hair is to be groomed and be in a well kept manner also. Males hair is to be kept short and not touching the ears or touching the collar.

The hair on top of the head must be neatly groomed. The length and bulk of the hair may not be excessive or present a ragged, unkempt, or extreme appearance. The hair must present a tapered appearance. A tapered appearance is one where the outline of the soldier’s hair conforms to the shape of the head, curving inward to the natural termination point at the base of the neck. When the hair is combed, it will not fall over the ears or eyebrows, or touch the collar, except for the closely cut hair at the back of the neck. Males will keep sideburns neatly trimmed.

Sideburns may not be flared; the base of the sideburn will be a clean shaven, horizontal line. Sideburns will not extend below the lowest part of the exterior ear opening. all clothing will have a proper fit and always be in a serviceable manner at all times. We will maintain a high standard of dress and appearance. Uniforms will fit properly; trousers, pants, or skirts should not fit tightly; and personnel must keep uniforms clean and serviceable and press them as necessary. Soldiers must project a military image that leaves no doubt that they live by a common military standard and are responsible to military order and discipline.

Soldiers will ensure that articles carried in pockets do not protrude from the pocket or present a bulky appearance. The trousers are to have a proper fit and not to look baggy. This uniform is designed to fit loosely; alterations to make the uniform fit tightly are not authorized. A tight fit reduces the airflow needed for ventilation and cooling. The coat is worn outside the trousers. Soldiers will not wear a belt with this uniform. Soldiers will wear the trousers bloused, using the draw cords or blousing rubbers, if the trousers are not tucked into the boots.

Personnel will not wrap the trouser legs around the leg tightly enough to present a straight appearance. Soldiers will not blouse the boots so that the trouser leg extends down to the ankle area. When bloused, the trousers should not extend below the third eyelet from the top of the boot. So that is an example of how a soldier is to look at all times. We are to maintain a proper appearance at all times. This goes to show how the military works. If we did not have rules and regulations, we would not have a proper working military.

We have rules and regulations for a reason, they are there so a soldier knows how to act and dress at all times. Also we are to conduct ourselves in a different way when we are at war too. There is a such thing as rules of engagement. It states that we are not engage upon enemies unless engaged upon first. It has to be the same amount of force as the enemy has used. If they shoot, we are allowed to return fire. But, if they throw rocks and other objects then all we are allowed to do is yell at them. If we did not have that rule we would be using force that is not necessary.

We would shoot or kill people that that does not deserve to be shot or killed. If that was the case we would be a Hitlerism nation. We would not care how we won a war or who we had to kill to get to that point. We have rules and regulations on how to keep clean in the field. That’s one regulation you do not want to disobey. It says that if you do not take care of yourself, your living area, or your food, you can get very sick. Your water can start to grow bacteria and different kinds of fungus. Not to mention that if you do no wash your self good enough, you can get some crazy infections.

I am surprised that there is not a regulation on how to breath properly on a daily basis. But I would not be either. The regulations are put out there so every one knows what the military life is supposed to like. We have to abide by them at all times day in day out. To me the rules and regulations are to be enforced so that no body is messing up and always in the right. Plus, if there is some thing that you get questioned on, then you can pull up the ar670-1. Like here is a story for you; I had a lt. colonel tell me that I was out of regulations to wear a thumb ring.

I told that it was authorized to wear because according to ar670-1 paragraph 14 sub B it states that your authorized to wear two rings. One on each hand, and a wedding set (a bridal set) counts as one. But it does not state that you can or cannot have a ring on your thumb. And also my First sergeant told me that we were not allowed to wear a bracelet. Well I looked it up and come to find out that you are not authorized to wear a bracelet unless it is an identifying bracelet. So I found a loop hole, I made a bracelet with a dog tag on it. Now I was in regulation. Then there is a hair color regulation too.

It says that you are not authorized to color your hair unless it is a natural color. Your not allowed to have weird colors like pink or bright red. This one girl got an article 15 for having three different colors in her hair and for destruction to government property. If that is the case then we should not be allowed to have tattoos, because your putting permanent markings on your body. And, also females should not be able to get piercings, because they are causing permanent damage to there bodies. But that is the way the military works. We have to follow the regulations regardless if we agree with them or not.

Good leadership promotes professionalism—a relation of standards, involving quality of life, service, discipline and total commitment to our Army and the United States of America. This really sucks because they know that I’m not going to be able to get ten thousand words on one subject. Now if it was like three or more I am sure that it would not be to hard. Seems like pretty good motivation to obey any order you’re given, right? Nope. These articles require the obedience of LAWFUL orders. An order which is unlawful not only does not need to be obeyed, but obeying such an order can result in criminal prosecution of the one who obeys it.

Military courts have long held that military members are accountable for their actions even while following orders — if the order was illegal. “I was only following orders,” has been unsuccessfully used as a legal defense in hundreds of cases (probably most notably by Nazi leaders at the Nuremberg tribunals following World War II). The defense didn’t work for them, nor has it worked in hundreds of cases since. The first recorded case of a United States Military officer using the “I was only following orders” defense dates back to 1799.

During the War with France, Congress passed a law making it permissible to seize ships bound to any French Port. However, when President John Adams wrote the order to authorize the U. S. Navy to do so, he wrote that Navy ships were authorized to seize any vessel bound for a French port, or traveling from a French port. Pursuant to the President’s instructions, a U. S. Navy captain seized a Danish Ship (the Flying Fish), which was en route from a French Port. The owners of the ship sued the Navy captain in U. S. maritime court for trespass. They won, and the United States Supreme Court upheld the decision.

The U. S. Supreme Court held that Navy commanders “act at their own peril” when obeying presidential orders when such orders are illegal. The Vietnam War presented the United States military courts with more cases of the “I was only following orders” defense than any previous conflict. The decisions during these cases reaffirmed that following manifestly illegal orders is not a viable defense from criminal prosecution. In United States v. Keenan, the accused (Keenan) was found guilty of murder after he obeyed in order to shoot and kill an elderly Vietnamese citizen.

The Court of Military Appeals held that “the justification for acts done pursuant to orders does not exist if the order was of such a nature that a man of ordinary sense and understanding would know it to be illegal. ” (Interestingly, the soldier who gave Keenan the order, Corporal Luczko, was acquitted by reason of insanity). Probably the most famous case of the “I was only following orders” defense was the court-martial (and conviction for premeditated murder) of First Lieutenant William Calley for his part in the My Lai Massacre on March 16, 1968.

The military court rejected Calley’s argument of obeying the order of his superiors. On March 29, 1971, Calley was sentenced to life in prison. However, the public outcry in the United States following this very publicized and controversial trial was such that President Nixon granted him clemency. Calley wound up spending 3 1/2 years under house arrest at Fort Benning Georgia, where a federal judge ultimately ordered his release. In 2004, the military began court-martials of several military members deployed to Iraq for mistreating prisoners and detainees.

Several members claimed that they were only following the orders of military intelligence officials. Unfortunately (for them), that defense won’t fly. The mistreatment of prisoners is a crime under both international law, and the Uniform Code of Military Justice (see Article 93 — Cruelty and Maltreatment). It’s clear, under military law, that military members can be held accountable for crimes committed under the guise of “obeying orders,” and there is no requirement to obey orders which are unlawful. However, here’s the rub: A military member disobeys such orders at his/her own peril.

Ultimately, it’s not whether or not the military member thinks the order is illegal or unlawful, it’s whether military superiors (and courts) think the order was illegal or unlawful. Take the case of Michael New. In 1995, Spec-4 Michael New was serving with the 1/15 Battalion of the 3rd infantry Division of the U. S. Army at Schweinfurt, Germany. When assigned as part of a multi-national peacekeeping mission about to be deployed to Macedonia, Spec-4 New and the other soldiers in his unit were ordered to wear United Nations (U. N. ) Helmets and arm bands. New refused the order, contending that it was an illegal order.

New’s superiors disagreed. Ultimately, so did the court-martial panel. New was found guilty of disobeying a lawful order and sentenced to a bad conduct discharge. The Army Court of Criminal Appeals upheld the conviction, as did the Court of Appeals of the Armed Forces. What about an order to participate in a dangerous mission? Can the military legally order one to go on a “suicide mission? ” You bet they can. In October 2004, the Army announced that they it were investigating up to 19 members of a platoon from the 343rd Quartermaster Company based in Rock Hill, South Carolina, for refusing to transport supplies in a dangerous area of Iraq.

According to family members, some of the troops thought the mission was “too dangerous” because their vehicles were unarmored (or had little armor), and the route they were scheduled to take is one of the most dangerous in Iraq. According to reports, these members simply failed to show up for the pre-departure briefing for the mission. Can they be punished for this? They certainly can. An order to perform a dangerous mission is lawful, because it’s not an order to commit a crime. Under current law, and the Manual for Courts-Martial, “An order requiring the performance of a military duty r act may be inferred to be lawful and it is disobeyed at the peril of the subordinate. This inference does not apply to a patently illegal order, such as one that directs the commission of a crime. ” In fact, if it can be shown that one or more of the soldiers influenced others to disobey, they may find the crime of Mutiny, under Article 94 added to the list of charges. Mutiny carries the death penalty, even in “peace time. ” , to obey, or not to obey? It depends on the order. Military members disobey orders at their own risk. They also obey orders at their own risk. An order to commit a crime is unlawful.

An order to perform a military duty, no matter how dangerous is lawful, as long as it doesn’t involve commission of a crime. Military Discipline is a state of order and obedience existing within a command. It involves the ready subordination of the will of the individual for the good of the group. Military discipline is an extension and specialized application of the discipline demands habitual but reasoned obedience that preserves initiative and functions unfalteringly even in the absence of the commander. Discipline is created within a command by instilling a sense of confidence and responsibility in each individual.

Discipline demands correct performance of duty. The need for discipline is best inculcated in individual by appealing to his sense of reason. In the few instances where appeal to reason fail, the use of punishment is effective in causing a recalcitrant individual to conform and perhaps appreciate the need for discipline. Condemnation and earned praise from senior to his subordinate, either individually or collectively, for tasks well done serve to strengthen the disciplinary bonds which bind together the smooth functioning team. Max Anders says, “Only the disciplined ever get really good at anything. Everything in life requires some sort of discipline. Whether it is hitting a baseball, climbing a mountain, playing a musical instrument, making good grades or brushing your teeth it all comes down to a matter of discipline. “The core of a soldier is moral discipline. It is intertwined with the discipline of physical and mental achievem.. The Army is an old institution. In this country it dates back to the Washington’s time in 1775—76 when the Revolutionary War took place to proclaim our freedom from the British. One particular thing which Washington’s Army had in common with our modern Army today is discipline.

This is very important in order to keep our forces organized. A well—disciplined army will always come out the victor in battle. Take a look at Musolini’s army in Italy in the last War. When the going got tough, their troops got disorganized, failed to obey orders, and finally decided it was time to surrender. And so it happened with Hitler’s Third Reich. His troops got disorganized from the lack of proper discipline and as the proverb goes, “United We Stand, Divided We Fall”. The Third Reich fell. Our American Army is a well—organized fighting force and always will be, with the proper kind of discipline which we have now.

The officers in charge of each Army, Corps, Division, Regiment, down to the Platoon and Squad are all experienced, level—headed men and women, whose job it is to keep the men and women under them disciplined as well as informed as to what is going on and thereby gaining the men’s and women’s cooperation. From the five—star General down to the “lowly” Private, it is his duty to see that whatever his job is, it will be done properly. With such a fighting force, how can we lose? Remember, “United We Stand, Divided We Fall”. We SHALL NOT Fall. It is so that you know what you are allowed to do and not to do, and to maintain control.

It is the same in life, they call that the law. To me I joined the military because I was ture to the oath Bear true faith and allegiance to the U. S. Constitution, the Army, your unit and other Soldiers. Bearing true faith and allegiance is a matter of believing in and devoting yourself to something or someone. A loyal Soldier is one who supports the leadership and stands up for fellow Soldiers. By wearing the uniform of the U. S. Army you are expressing your loyalty. And by doing your share, you show your loyalty to your unit. Face fear, danger or adversity (physical or moral). Personal courage has long been associated with our Army.

With physical courage, it is a matter of enduring physical duress and at times risking personal safety. Facing moral fear or adversity may be a long, slow process of continuing forward on the right path, especially if taking those actions is not popular with others. You can build your personal courage by daily standing up for and acting upon the things that you know are honorable that a potential Soldier should understand the basics about service before they enlist. if it appeals to you! What it Means to be a Soldier Serving in the Army is a life-changing experience—and a serious commitment.

So it stands to reason The Army is an elite group of warriors who dedicate a portion of their time to serving their nation. Each state has its own Guard, as required by the Constitution; in fact, it is the only branch of the military whose What is existence is actually required by the Constitution. Review all of our info about the National Guard and see Nation The first and foremost responsibility will be protecting and defending American interests. This may mean deployment out of state or overseas. If they’re called up, they’ll be ready. Community

Nearly 400 years ago, the Guard mobilized for the first time to help neighbors in times of need. This is still our main role: helping the community during natural disasters and civil emergencies. Qualifications Physical fitness, age, education, height and weight are the primary factors that determine whether a would-be member can join the Guard. Visit our Standards page for more information. Where Do They Serve? Usually, a Soldier serves where they live. There’s a National Guard in all 50 American states, as well as in the four territories, so typically, they’ll live at home and drill once a month at the nearest armory.

If mobilized by the federal government, they may serve out of state or overseas. Three to six years is typical but length of service depends on the enlistment option they chose at the time of enlistment. College, career and other personal commitments are also factors, but I plan to make a carreer out of the military so rules and regulations are very important to me, There is a long and noble history of the United States Army serving at home and abroad to ensure the safety and freedom of their fellow citizens. They have combated natural disasters, supported Army troops and, when called upon, borne arms against their nation’s enemies.

Proud Soldier Since 1636, the army has brought glory and honor upon itself and its soldiers through quiet and selfless service. Do you think you have what it takes to be a member of this select group? In the army you become a Soldier. What does it mean to be a Soldier? It’s being a part of noble tradition of service extending back almost 400 years. It means you become a member of the best trained, best equipped, and most respected military force in history. It means you will make a difference and follow commands of others. Following Orders The importance of following orders cannot be emphasized enough.

In the military world this is key to mission success. When a competent authority issues an order, it is issued with the understanding that subordinates will carry out that order, effectively and efficiently. When or where that order is issued does not make a difference on the importance of that order. The orders issued in garrison are just as important as the ones being issued in a combat zone. It is important that the order be understood and done when told to, to avoid further problems. Military discipline and effectiveness is built on the foundation of obedience to orders.

Recruits are taught to obey, immediately and without question, orders from their superiors, right from day one of boot camp. Military members who fail to obey the lawful orders of their superiors risk serious consequences. Article 90 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) makes it a crime for a military member to willfully disobey a superior commissioned officer. Article 91 makes it a crime to willfully disobey a superior Noncommissioned or Warrant Officer. Article 92 makes it a crime to disobey any lawful order (the disobedience does not have to be “willful” under this article).

In fact, under Article 90, during times of war, a military member who willfully disobeys a superior commissioned officer can be sentenced to death. These articles require the obedience of lawful orders. An order which is unlawful not only does not need to be obeyed, but obeying such an order can result in criminal prosecution of the one who obeys it. Military courts have long held that military members are accountable for their actions even while following orders, even if the order was illegal. Orders can have a variety of purposes, most of which builds discipline.

Whether a Marine is told to clean the head or to bring in gear, the orders given are to instill good character in the Marines. When it comes down to it, there are orders issued for almost everything in the military. Since this practice is so frequent, Marines have learned to make it part of their instinct to follow orders when given. It is written in the promotion warrants that subordinates will render obedience to orders given from superiors, so it is difficult to say that Marines are not reminded of it. Following orders can apply to almost everything you do in life.

Everyone follows orders, even the Commandant. So if a four star General has to follow orders, its automatic that everyone below him must do the same. Even before you join the military following orders is part of life. In school the teachers give orders to students, it may not be the same as the military but they are orders. Listening to your parents when they told you to do something was following orders. Sometimes it is hard to cope with the orders that are given, but the judgment of those issuing orders needs to be trusted.

I think following direct orders is important because for starters nothing would ever get done because everyone would gaf everyone else off and it might not sound that bad but if you were to put the scenario into a combat situation marines would die all because someone didn’t follow a direct order, for instance if you were told to hold a position with your marines and you moved anyway’s you could cost everyone their lives and loose a war. To obey someone means to comply with or fulfill the commands, restrictions, wishes, or instructions of that specific person. We are taught as children to obey our higher-ups.

Starting from our parents, teachers, managers, police officers and so on. So how does this relate to the military? Well, when a person enlists in the United States Military, they take the following oath; “I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Right there you are making a promise to the United States Military. Before you even put on the uniform, you promise you’ll obey the orders of the President and the orders of the officers appointed over you. Military discipline and effectiveness is built on the foundation of obedience to orders. Brand new privates are taught to obey, immediately and without question, orders from their superiors, right from the start. Almost any devil can tell you that obedience was drilled into their heads at one point or another.

For example, no talking on the phone while walking, don’t put your hands in your pockets, and stand a parade rest. Those are just the simple orders you are made to obey in the military. Greater orders mean bigger consequences. Military members who fail to obey the lawful orders of their superiors risk serious consequences. I know that knowing the rules and regulations is what is going to make me move up the rank and make me a all around better marine. I need to work on discipline sometimes and am going to correct my unacceptable behavior .

So in my essay I have listed many characteristics and examples of how following orders is important. I feel the Marine Corps values have a big role in rules and regulations because if you follow the values you will not have as difficult a time in the corps It’s very important to follow directions, or else the world would be in chaos. When someone tells you that you must follow directions so that everything can go in an orderly fashion, it’s important to do so because they know what’s going to happen if you don’t.

It’s important to follow directions because if you don’t something can go wrong, it’s important follow directions because if you don’t you’ll get in trouble, and it’s also important to follow directions because if you don’t you’ll be writing this essay too. If you decide to cross the street and someone tells you not to, their telling you for a reason, maybe so that you won’t get hit by a car or get shot at in a drive by shooting. It’s important follow directions because if you don’t you’ll get in trouble. Thank you very much for taking time to read my essay on following orders.